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20120701
20120731
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
's argument had "injured us more, and has been as great a barrier to our emancipation as any thing that has ever been advanced against us," for it had " sunk deep into the hearts of millions of the whites, and never will be removed this side of eternity." so, the ideal of equality jefferson proclaimed, he also betrayed. he got it right when he wrote about "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." as the core of our human aspirations. but he lived it wrong, denying to others the rights he claimed for himself. and that's how jefferson came to embody the oldest and longest war of all -- the war between the self and the truth, between what we know and how we live. so enjoy the fireworks and flags, the barbecues and bargain sales. but hold this thought as well -- that behind this fourth of july holiday are human beings who were as flawed and conflicted as they were inspired. if they were to look upon us today they most likely would think as they did then, how much remains to be done. with those contradictions of american history in mind, this seemed a good time to talk with khalil gibran muh
the colleges come together with us and start working with these young people while they're still in high school. >> suarez: judy woodruff looks back at the major decisions in this high-impact supreme court term with historian michael beschloss and marcia coyle of the "national law journal." >> ifill: and on this most american of holidays, we turn to the men who signed the declaration of independence and what happened to them after they did. >> they were placed under house arrest. they had-- they were allowed to write letters home. they were visited by physicians. no one was ever tortured. that's something i have seen over the years and it is wrong. every time i see it, i shudder. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill:
on the aftermath of fierce fighting, as government forces use helicopter gunships and heavy artillery to pound the rebels. >> woodruff: and in a second election story, ray suarez reports on a voting rights showdown in a battleground state. >> a court here will be asked to decide whether pennsylvania can run next november's elections with one of the toughest voter i.d. laws in the country still in place. >> ifill: i sat down with sir elton john to talk about his new book and his determination to put an end to the aids crisis. >> i feel strong enough and lucky enough to open up and say "i'm h.i.v.-positive" then we're facing an uphill battle. >> woodruff: and we talk with miles o'brien about the lasting legacy of the first american woman to enter space, astronaut sally ride. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoi
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)